The Latest

Jan 17, 2014 / 346 notes
Jan 17, 2014 / 50 notes

slycivilian:

This is a song written and performed by Abdullahi Qarshe. The album is aptly entitled “The Freedom Songs of the Somali Republic”.  I translated one of his songs a few months ago. See it here. I won’t tell you about the song itself, I’ll let the man tell you himself, in an interview with/on Bildhaan in 1994 (if you haven’t seen Bildhaan already, please do. It’s wonderful for Somali culture and history). Read the full interview here.

It gives a real insight into the man who wrote the Somali national anthem.

Interviewer: During the 1960s, two of your songs stood out. One was “Lumumba Mana Noola Mana Dhiman” (Lumumba is neither Alive nor Dead). The second was “Dugsiyada Ogaada u Aada” (Be Alert to Education and Go to School!). Could you remind us of some of the lines of the first song?

Abdullahi Qarshe: Oh, yes: “Lumumba mana noola mana dhiman, Labada midna ha umalaynina, Inu maqanyahay ha u moodina, Laba midna ha a malaynina” (Lumumba is neither alive nor dead, don’t think that he is either, for his spirit is with us, don’t think he has disappeared. Don’t think that he is either, for his spirit is with us).

Interviewer: How did this song come to you?

Abdullahi Qarshe: One day, I came out from my house and saw a crowd listening to the radio in front of a tea shop. The news was about the crisis in Congo in 1962. The U.N. forces had just intervened in the civil war, ostensibly to save the Prime Minister of Congo, Patrice Lumumba, who was arrested and later assassinated by his opponents. “Lumumba mana noolamana dhiman” had a kind of Pan-African sentiment because of Lumumba’s nationalist vision and courage.

This is the type of African nationalism I can get behind. I want those days back. 

miksi-ei:

Ancient churches in Lalibela, Ethiopia (Summer 2012)
Dec 22, 2013 / 382 notes

miksi-ei:

Ancient churches in Lalibela, Ethiopia (Summer 2012)

Dec 15, 2013 / 602 notes

KHARTOUM, SUDAN (1976)

(via qayblibaax)


Somali Democratic Republic May Day poster
Text: Long live the cooperation between Somali workers, farmers and pastoralists!
Dec 6, 2013 / 105 notes

Somali Democratic Republic May Day poster

Text: Long live the cooperation between Somali workers, farmers and pastoralists!

(via qayblibaax)

Dec 6, 2013 / 50,597 notes
nomadamsterdam:

Somali women in Djibouti City (1976), Djibouti, Africa. Via @Heritagecity
Nov 10, 2013 / 908 notes

nomadamsterdam:

Somali women in Djibouti City (1976), Djibouti, Africa. 

Via @Heritagecity

Old days of Somalia: University students in Mogadishu, 1976.  
Nov 10, 2013 / 617 notes

Old days of Somalia: University students in Mogadishu, 1976.  

Oct 25, 2013 / 863 notes

dynamicafrica:

Combining logographic and alphabetic elements, hieroglyphics was the writing system used by the Ancient Egyptians, between 3200 BC – AD 400, that can be found on various media such as pyramid walls and clay tablets, to wooden objects, clay sculptures and papyrus scrolls.

Hieroglyphs can be recognized as three kinds of glyphs: phonetic glyphs, including single-consonant characters that function like an alphabet; logographs, representing morphemes; and determinatives, which narrow down the meaning of logographic or phonetic words.

Despite great efforts by mostly Western historians, “no definitive determination has been made as to the origin of hieroglyphics in ancient Egypt.”

The Rosetta Stone is one of the most famous objects that contains script written (partially) in Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics and it has provided the key to the modern understanding of Egyptian hieroglyphs.

(source)

October: Highlighting African Art & African Artists

Old days of Somalia. Cool car!
Oct 15, 2013 / 1,063 notes

Old days of Somalia. Cool car!